Amsterdam Sights

Museum Van Loon

former patrician house of the Amsterdam regent family Van Loon


Museum Van Loon is a splendid, double-sized canal house which was built in 1672 by architect Adriaen Dortsman, who was also designed Ronde Lutherse Kerk on Singel. The first resident was the painter Ferdinand Bol, one of Rembandt's most famous pupils.

Facade of Museum van Loon on Keizersgracht


What's on in Museum Van Loon

⟩   agenda


In the 19th century, the Van Loon family came to live in the house. The family's history is closely intertwined with that of Amsterdam. Several Van Loons held important positions as city-mayors. Others, such as Willem van Loon, fulfilled decisive functions in the Dutch East India Company.

The last resident of the house, before it became a museum, was Thora van Loon - Egidius. She was Dame du Palais of Queen Wilhelmina for forty years, and as such invited important royal guests to the house.

Interior and garden

Throughout time, the interior and exterior have remained largely intact during the last centuries and still evokes the splendor of the Golden Age.

In the rooms, a large collection of paintings, fine furniture, precious silvery and porcelain from different centuries is on display. Behind the house is a beautiful garden, an oasis of quiet in the modern inner city.

The garden is bordered on the far side by the classical fa├žade of the coach house. This original unity of canal house, garden and coach house is nowhere else to be seen.


How to get there?

tram16 - stop Keizersgracht
parkingApcoa Parking Prins & Keizer


 click on image to enlarge map Amsterdam

Museum Van Loon

Keizersgracht 672
Amsterdam (Canal Belt)

official website
www.museumvanloon.nl


Opening hours

Sun 10:00 - 17:00
Mon 10:00 - 17:00
Tue 10:00 - 17:00
Wed 10:00 - 17:00
Thu 10:00 - 17:00
Fri 10:00 - 17:00
Sat 10:00 - 17:00

Entrance fee

€ 9adults
€ 56-18 years
free0-5 years


Note that the actual museum is on Herengracht, but the entrance for the museum is on Keizersgracht 633, the former carriage house.





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